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Photoset

Sep 17, 2014
@ 9:23 pm
Permalink
511 notes

superlark:

I beat puzzles and lawyers recently, it was a really fun game and I drew a handful of doodles while I was playing. This game plus all the famitsu scans lately though… it just makes me more eager to play shu takumi’s newest ace attorney…!!

(via edencomplex)


Photoset

Sep 17, 2014
@ 10:53 am
Permalink
6,867 notes

yuko9895:

Finally saw how they made the elevator fight.

I’m soooooo happy I’m gonna cry.

(via shorelinewaves)


Text

Sep 17, 2014
@ 10:22 am
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11,692 notes

durinsheir:

elvenkingthrandy:

why does this look like a love story

image

image

 via durinssons

(via algrenion)


Photoset

Sep 17, 2014
@ 10:10 am
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95,045 notes

The Rio Caño Cristales - most colorful river (caused by algae and moss seen through the water), Colombia.

(Source: weather.com, via madragingven)


Photo

Sep 16, 2014
@ 9:45 pm
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70,857 notes

(Source: limonatasevenbirurl, via goobygoh)


Photoset

Sep 16, 2014
@ 9:41 pm
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41,451 notes

viria:

I NEVER KNEW HOW BADLY I NEEDED HAIKYUU!! RULE 63 UNTIL I DREW ONE. and I should be working, working on important stuff

but there was no escape, my hand was drawing uncontrollably 

also a little bonus with managers which I was too tired to finish:

(via torashii)


Photo

Sep 16, 2014
@ 3:19 pm
Permalink
36,862 notes

vampirecheetah:

megabeeprime:

underscorex:

brydeswhale:

cosplayingwhileblack:

X
Character: Leia
Series: Star Wars

OMG HER HAIR MAKES SO MUCH MORE SENSE THIS WAY.

LOVE IT.

Leia with afro puffs is the best Leia.

this is perhaps the single most fabulous thing I have ever seen.

vampirecheetah:

megabeeprime:

underscorex:

brydeswhale:

cosplayingwhileblack:

X

Character: Leia

Series: Star Wars

OMG HER HAIR MAKES SO MUCH MORE SENSE THIS WAY.

LOVE IT.

Leia with afro puffs is the best Leia.

this is perhaps the single most fabulous thing I have ever seen.

(via jesrever)


Photoset

Sep 16, 2014
@ 10:58 am
Permalink
3,535 notes

ryanestradadotcom:

Learn To Read Russian in 15 Minutes! I did this one with my fabulous guest writer Peter Starr Northrop, aka bilgeathresh! If you want me to make these dang comics more often, visit my Patreon!


Text

Sep 16, 2014
@ 10:55 am
Permalink
1,899 notes

yummytomatoes:



image 
buy two striders yet two lalondes free 

(via blogzak)


Photo

Sep 16, 2014
@ 3:47 am
Permalink
4,820 notes

referenceforwriters:


S E T T I N G (Image source)

The setting consists of these elements, which you ought to describe through the course of the story. It is up to you, however, to decide how necessary it is to do so and why.
Which element is more important right now? Why? The most common answer is because it plays an impact on the story, so you should give it a higher priority in that particular moment. Overall we should get a feeling however brief of each or most of them.
Why are settings important at all? Because the story is happening somewhere. Even if it’s happening in a void or in the middle of a nothingness, you could describe it. It helps making your story more memorable and your writing more vivid. 
How much should you describe? Again, there isn’t a rule. It is up to you. You’d not spend a page describing a room that plays no interesting or important part in the story, would you? If you do it, you’ll make the readers believe it is more important than it actually is, or bore them out. During the first draft you can spend as much as you want pointing out details of the environment and the space but know that during revision, they could and will get cut out if they’re not relevant whatsoever.
The relationship between world-building and the settings: they’re directly related. If you’re creating a new world you’ll have to work through a lot of describing, and that has to do with—you guessed it—the environment. The space, time and temperature. All of these have to do with the world you’re creating if they’re different from what we normally see or if they’re not.
Let’s say it, describing things is oftentimes quite fun and a great way to practice vocabulary and your use of metaphors and similes to show and not tell in a powerful way. 
The following links provide great advice on both settings and world building and I recommend checking them out.
Common Setting Failures
The Senses and World Building
Fantasy World Building Questions
Tips on Revealing Setting
The Rules of Quick and Dirty World Building
The Description Pyramid
Physical Descriptions Put Readers Into Place
Location, Location, Location
Creating Your Own World
Imagery
-Alex

referenceforwriters:

S E T T I N G (Image source)

The setting consists of these elements, which you ought to describe through the course of the story. It is up to you, however, to decide how necessary it is to do so and why.

  • Which element is more important right now? Why? The most common answer is because it plays an impact on the story, so you should give it a higher priority in that particular moment. Overall we should get a feeling however brief of each or most of them.
  • Why are settings important at all? Because the story is happening somewhere. Even if it’s happening in a void or in the middle of a nothingness, you could describe it. It helps making your story more memorable and your writing more vivid. 
  • How much should you describe? Again, there isn’t a rule. It is up to you. You’d not spend a page describing a room that plays no interesting or important part in the story, would you? If you do it, you’ll make the readers believe it is more important than it actually is, or bore them out. During the first draft you can spend as much as you want pointing out details of the environment and the space but know that during revision, they could and will get cut out if they’re not relevant whatsoever.
  • The relationship between world-building and the settings: they’re directly related. If you’re creating a new world you’ll have to work through a lot of describing, and that has to do with—you guessed it—the environment. The space, time and temperature. All of these have to do with the world you’re creating if they’re different from what we normally see or if they’re not.
  • Let’s say it, describing things is oftentimes quite fun and a great way to practice vocabulary and your use of metaphors and similes to show and not tell in a powerful way. 

The following links provide great advice on both settings and world building and I recommend checking them out.

-Alex

(via writeworld)